Office Phone: 479-621-0385 | AR Child Abuse Hotline: 1-844-SAVE-A-CHILD

The Children's Advocacy Center of Benton County

Our Vision: Eliminate Child Abuse

Our Mission: Empowering Children to Find their Voice

Our Purpose: To provide a safe place for child abuse victims and their families to receive comprehensive services from dedicated professional interviewers, nurses, counselors and advocates in a child-friendly atmosphere through a coordinated team approach as well as provide child abuse prevention, awareness, and education to the community.

Click here to learn more and get involved.

At the Children’s Advocacy Center of Benton County abused children and their families can receive the support needed to deal with the abuse. We are available to serve all Benton County child abuse victims under age 18 after a report has been made to the child abuse hotline. 

Learn More about Our Services:

In 2016, we provided 950 initial services to children, and:

  • Conducted Forensic Interviews

    916

  • Performed Forensic Medical Exams

    230

  • Provided Counseling Sessions

    2,116

  • Facilitated Educational Training to Individuals

    9,213

Today is Martin Luther King Jr. Day

Martin Luther King Jr. was the chief spokesman for nonviolent activism in the Civil Rights Movement, which successfully protested racial discrimination in federal and state law. The campaign for a federal holiday in King's honor began soon after his assassination in 1968. President Ronald Reagan signed the holiday into law in 1983, and it was first observed three years later. At first, some states resisted observing the holiday as such, giving it alternative names or combining it with other holidays. It was officially observed in all 50 states for the first time in 2000.

The idea of Martin Luther King, Jr. Day as a holiday was promoted by labor unions in contract negotiations. After King's death, U.S. Representative John Conyers and U.S. Senator Edward Brooke introduced a bill in Congress to make King's birthday a national holiday. The bill first came to a vote in the U.S. House of Representatives in 1979. However, it fell five votes short of the number needed for passage. Two of the main arguments mentioned by opponents were that a paid holiday for federal employees would be too expensive, and that a holiday to honor a private citizen would be contrary to longstanding tradition (King had never held public office). Only two other figures have national holidays in the U.S. honoring them: George Washington and Christopher Columbus.

Soon after, the King Center turned to support from the corporate community and the general public. The success of this strategy was cemented when musician Stevie Wonder released the single "Happy Birthday" to popularize the campaign in 1980 and hosted the Rally for Peace Press Conference in 1981. Six million signatures were collected for a petition to Congress to pass the law, termed by a 2006 article in The Nation as "the largest petition in favor of an issue in U.S. history.

Today, consider taking a moment to recognize Martin Luther King Jr.’s impact on America.

© 2017 Children's Advocacy Center of Benton County

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